2022-06-10

2 minute read

Advice given on June 10, 2022.

Candy Crusher

Hey Jay,

I have a sweet tooth, and it’s becoming a problem. I’ve always had a love of sweets, but things are beginning to spiral out of control. I generally am enjoying candy bars or other sweets more frequently than I eat regular food. I find myself getting irritated, tired, and sad when I go too long without eating some candy. I need to break this habit. Do you have any suggestions for me?

Thanks,

Candy Crusher

Crusher,

The first step to solving any behavioral issue (in my opinion) is admitting and recognizing that the problem exists. You’ve clearly done this and I applaud you for it. Next, you must develop a reasonable and achievable plan of action to change your behavior. Do you keep all of your candy in a single place? Maybe you can start there and place some healthy snacks in front of the candy to encourage you to make healthier decisions. You could try logging your daily candy intake, and setting goals based on your current consumption. Once you are able to get some sort of realistic plan put together, I suggest you go ahead and try to follow it. Be prepared to have backslides and moments of weakness, that’s totally normal! But I’m proud of you for recognizing your bad habit and trying to fix it. The journey will be difficult, but you’ll ultimately feel healthier and better in the long-run.

Good luck,

Jay

Dramady

Hey Jay,

I’ve developed this nasty habit of comically over-reacting to things that happen to me. For example, if I’m misstep and slightly stumble while walking, I will exaggerate the stumble and sometimes roll on the ground. I don’t act injured, but I turn awkward physical situations into comically over-acted performances. While this is funny, and seems fine sometimes, I’ve started doing this all the time. I need some help breaking this habit. How can I accomplish that?

Drama King

King,

You sound like a funny guy. It sounds like what was a funny one-off gag has now become an almost compulsive habit. In that case, I’d agree that things are a bit out of control. Do you over-act when you are totally alone and there is nobody there to watch your “performance”? In any case, I think you need to be hyper-aware of your actions for a little while. It might even help for you to intentionally stumble, or misstep, and then not act out. This might help re-train your brain and muscle-memory to stop over-acting when these situations crop up more naturally. If you’re unable to fix this behavior yourself, you could consult some sort of therapist or other healthcare professional to help you break this habit.

Good luck,

Jay